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news-test 2018-1207
07 Dec, 2018

news-test 2018-1207


English
Pronunciation /ˈɪŋɡlɪʃ/[1]
Region Worldwide
Native speakers
360–400 million (2006)[2]
L2 speakers: 400 million;
as a foreign language: 600–700 million[2]
Indo-European
Early forms
Old English
Manually coded English
(multiple systems)
Official status
Official language in
Language codes
ISO 639-1 en
ISO 639-2 eng
ISO 639-3 eng
Glottolog stan1293[3]
Linguasphere 52-ABA
Anglospeak.png
  Areas where English is a majority native language
  Areas where English is official but not a majority native language
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For a guide to IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and eventually became a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Britain that would later take their name, England, both names ultimately deriving from the Anglia peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic language), as well as by Latin and French.[6]

English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old EnglishMiddle English began in the late 11th century with the Norman conquest of England and was a period in which the language was influenced by French.[7] Early Modern English began in the late 15th century with the introduction of the printing press to London, the printing of the King James Bible and the start of the Great Vowel Shift.[8]

Through the worldwide influence of the British EmpireModern English spread around the world from the 17th to mid-20th centuries. Through all types of printed and electronic media, and spurred by the emergence of the United States as a global superpower, English has become the leading language of international discourse and the lingua franca in many regions and professional contexts such as science, navigation and law.[9]